100%
LESSONS & TOPICS

TAEASS413 – 1. Prepare for validation activities.

TAEASS413 – 1. Prepare for validation activities.

Preparing for validation activities is a crucial aspect of ensuring the quality of assessments in vocational education and training (VET) in Australia. These activities aim to verify the validity, reliability, a1.1 Confirm purpose, context, and scope of planned assessment validationce with the relevant training package or qualification. Planning, preparing, and conducting validation activities involve reviewing assessment tools and processes, collecting feedback from students and other stakeholders, and analysing assessment data. Proper preparation ensures that validation activities are conducted efficiently, effectively, and in compliance with regulatory requirements.This chapter delves into the significance of preparing for validation activities in VET, highlighting the benefits of validation, the key steps involved in preparing for validation activities, and the types of evidence that need to be gathered. It also provides practical guidance on how to prepare for validation activities, including tips on selecting appropriate assessment tools, gathering feedback, and analysing assessment data.    

1.1 Confirm the purpose, context, and scope of planned assessment validation

A group of people sitting at a table  Description automatically generated with medium confidence

 

This chapter provides an in-depth exploration of the significance of confirming the purpose, context, and scope of planned assessment validation in vocational education and training (VET). It covers the benefits of a systematic approach, the critical steps involved in the process, and the selection criteria for appropriate assessment tools and processes. Practical guidance on how to confirm the purpose, context, and scope of planned assessment validation is also included, with tips on conducting a needs analysis, selecting validation methods, and documenting the results. VET assessors, trainers, and other industry professionals must understand the importance of confirming the purpose, context, and scope of planned assessment validation to ensure the quality and validity of VET assessments. By adopting best practices and taking a systematic approach, they can ensure that their validation activities are effective, efficient, and contribute to the ongoing improvement of VET assessment practices.

1.1.1 Introduction to Assessment Validation

Assessment validation is a critical process in vocational education and training (VET) that aims to ensure that assessment tools and processes are valid, reliable, and fair and that they comply with the requirements of the relevant training package or qualification. Assessment validation is a quality assurance process that helps to verify that assessments are fit for purpose and that they accurately measure the knowledge and skills that students have gained.

RTOs need a plan that sets out when validation for each training product will occur. The plan is a requirement of Clause 1.9 of the Standards for Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) 2015.

The assessment validation process involves a range of activities, such as reviewing assessment tools and processes, collecting feedback from students and other stakeholders, and analysing assessment data. The process ensures that assessments are conducted in a way that is consistent with the intended purpose, context, and scope of the assessment.

Assessment validation is essential to ensure that VET assessments are reliable, valid, and fair. Reliable assessments are consistent and accurate, while valid assessments measure what they are intended to measure. Fair assessments provide equal opportunities for all students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills without discrimination.

1.1.2 Confirming purpose, context, and scope of planned assessment validation.

Confirming the purpose, context, and scope of planned assessment validation is an important step for trainers before participating in the validation process. It helps ensure that trainers have a clear understanding of the objectives, context, and boundaries of the validation activities. Following are ways in which trainers can confirm these aspects:

Purpose of Assessment Validation:

Clarify the purpose of the assessment validation. It may be to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements, improve the quality of assessments, or enhance consistency in assessment practices.

Understand how the validation outcomes will be used to inform decision-making and improve the overall assessment process.

Context of Assessment Validation:

Determine the context in which the assessment validation will take place. This may be within a specific vocational education and training (VET) organisation or across multiple organisations.

Consider the industry or sector to which the assessments relate, as the context may impact the specific requirements and expectations of the validation process.

Scope of Assessment Validation:

Define the scope of the assessment validation. Identify the specific units of competency, qualifications, or assessment tools that will be validated.

Understand the time frame and resources allocated for the validation activities to ensure effective planning and participation.

Review Validation Plan or Framework:

Become familiar with the validation plan or framework provided by the relevant authorities or the training organisation.

Review the documentation to understand the objectives, processes, and expectations for the assessment validation.

Seek Clarification and Discuss with Stakeholders:

Engage in discussions with other validation participants, such as fellow trainers, assessors, subject matter experts, and industry representatives.

Seek clarification on any uncertainties or gaps in understanding regarding the purpose, context, or scope of the assessment validation.

Align with Regulatory and Organisational Requirements:

Ensure that the planned assessment validation aligns with the regulatory requirements of the VET sector, including the guidelines provided by the relevant authorities.

Consider the specific policies and procedures of the training organisation that govern assessment validation activities.

Communicate and Confirm Understanding:

Communicate with the validation team, assessment coordinator, or relevant stakeholders to confirm understanding of the purpose, context, and scope of the planned assessment validation. Seek their feedback and address any remaining questions or concerns to ensure a shared understanding.

By confirming the purpose, context, and scope of the planned assessment validation, trainers can align their efforts, expectations, and contributions with the intended outcomes. This ensures a focused and effective participation in the validation process, leading to improvements in assessment quality and consistency.

1.1.3 Key aspects of assessment validation (KE2)

Assessment validation involves a range of activities that are designed to ensure that assessment tools and processes are valid, reliable, and fair. There are several key aspects of assessment validation that are essential to ensuring the quality of VET assessments. These include:

Quality review process (KE2.1)

The quality review process is an important aspect of assessment validation. It involves a comprehensive evaluation of the assessment tools and processes to ensure that they meet the required standards of quality, validity, reliability, and fairness.

The process typically involves reviewing the assessment tools and processes against the relevant training package or qualification, as well as any relevant industry standards or regulations. This helps to ensure that the assessment tools and processes are fit for purpose and are aligned with the skills and knowledge required by the industry.

During the quality review process, assessors may examine a range of factors, such as:

Relevance and clarity of the assessment tasks

Assessment tasks are an essential part of the learning process as they provide students with an opportunity to demonstrate their understanding of a subject or topic. The relevance and clarity of assessment tasks are crucial for ensuring that students are assessed on what they have learned and that they can apply this knowledge effectively.

Relevance in assessment tasks refers to how well the task aligns with the learning objectives and outcomes of the course or program. It is important for teachers and instructors to ensure that assessment tasks are relevant to the learning objectives so that students are able to demonstrate their understanding of the key concepts and skills that they have been taught.

For example, if the learning objective is for students to be able to analyse and interpret data, then an assessment task that requires them to analyse and interpret a set of data would be relevant. On the other hand, an assessment task that requires them to write an essay about a topic unrelated to data analysis would not be relevant.

Clarity in assessment tasks refers to how well the task is understood by students. Clear assessment tasks ensure that students understand what is expected of them and can focus on demonstrating their knowledge and skills without being distracted by confusion or uncertainty.

To ensure clarity in assessment tasks, it is important for teachers and instructors to provide clear instructions, rubrics, and examples of the task. This will help students understand what is expected of them and how they will be assessed. Additionally, teachers and instructors should make themselves available to answer any questions or concerns that students may have about the assessment task.

Appropriateness of the assessment methods

Assessment methods play a critical role in evaluating students’ knowledge, skills, and abilities in a particular subject or topic. The appropriateness of assessment methods is important to ensure that students are evaluated fairly, accurately, and in line with the learning objectives of the course or program.

Appropriateness of assessment methods refers to whether the selected assessment methods are suitable for the learning outcomes and goals of the course or program. It is important for instructors to select assessment methods that match the learning objectives and the level of understanding that the students are expected to demonstrate.

For example, if the learning objective is to test the student’s ability to apply theoretical concepts in a practical setting, then a hands-on project or a practical exam would be an appropriate assessment method. Similarly, if the learning objective is to test the student’s ability to analyse and synthesise information, a written exam or essay would be an appropriate assessment method.

The appropriateness of assessment methods can also be influenced by factors such as the class size, time constraints, and resources available. For example, if the class size is large, then multiple-choice or short-answer questions may be a more appropriate assessment method than an essay or project, which would be more time-consuming to grade.

It is important for VET trainers and assessors to use multiple assessment methods to evaluate students’ knowledge and skills, rather than relying on a single assessment method. This helps to provide a more comprehensive and accurate evaluation of the students’ understanding of the subject or topic.

Quality of the assessment materials

The quality of assessment materials is essential for ensuring that students are evaluated fairly and accurately, and that the assessment aligns with the learning objectives of the course or program. High-quality assessment materials provide students with a clear understanding of what is expected of them and provide instructors with a reliable means of evaluating student knowledge and skills.

The quality of assessment materials can be evaluated in terms of several key factors, including:

Trainers and assessors should take great care to develop high-quality assessment materials that meet these criteria. Additionally, they should evaluate the assessment materials regularly to ensure that they remain valid, reliable, and bias-free, and that they continue to assess the knowledge and skills that students are expected to acquire.

Fairness and consistency of the assessment process.

Fairness and consistency are essential components of the assessment process. Fairness refers to the impartiality and lack of bias in the assessment process, while consistency refers to the degree to which the assessment process produces reliable and comparable results across different students and different evaluators.

A fair assessment process is one in which all students are evaluated based on the same criteria, and in which all students have an equal opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge and skills. This means that the assessment should be free of any form of bias,

whether intentional or unintentional, and that students should not be disadvantaged or advantaged by factors such as their race, gender, socio-economic status, or other personal characteristics.

To ensure fairness in the assessment process, instructors should develop clear and explicit assessment criteria, and communicate these criteria to students before the assessment takes place. Instructors should also provide students with feedback on their performance, and give them the opportunity to ask questions or request clarification.

Consistency in the assessment process refers to the degree to which the assessment results are reliable and comparable across different students and different evaluators. This means that the assessment should produce consistent results regardless of who is evaluating it, and that different evaluators should arrive at similar conclusions about students’ knowledge and skills.

To ensure consistency in the assessment process, instructors should use standardised assessment methods and procedures, and provide clear and explicit instructions to evaluators on how to evaluate the assessment materials. Instructors should also use multiple evaluators to assess student work and provide them with training and calibration to ensure that they are evaluating students consistently and accurately.

In conclusion, fairness and consistency are essential components of the assessment process. To ensure fairness, instructors should develop clear and explicit assessment criteria, provide feedback to students, and avoid bias. To ensure consistency, instructors should use standardised assessment methods and procedures, provide clear instructions to evaluators, use multiple evaluators, and provide training and calibration to evaluators. By ensuring fairness and consistency in the assessment process, instructors can provide students with a reliable means of demonstrating their knowledge and skills.

Assessors may also consider feedback from stakeholders, including students, trainers, and industry representatives, as well as data collected from previous assessments. This can help to identify areas for improvement and ensure that the assessment tools and processes remain up-to-date and relevant.

Overall, the quality review process is a crucial aspect of assessment validation, helping to ensure that assessment tools and processes are of high quality, and that they accurately measure the skills and knowledge required by the industry.

In addition to ensuring the quality, validity, reliability, and fairness of assessment tools and processes, it is also important to consider ethical, privacy, and confidentiality requirements during assessment validation. These requirements are crucial for ensuring that the assessment process is conducted in an ethical and professional manner, and that the privacy and confidentiality of student information is protected.

Assessment validation activities should be conducted in accordance with relevant ethical guidelines and principles by professional bodies in a particular field, such as those outlined by the Australian Psychological Society, the Australian Council for Educational Research, or the National Health and Medical Research Council. These guidelines may address issues such as informed consent, confidentiality, and the use of personal data.

Assessment validation activities should also comply with relevant privacy legislation, such as the Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) or the GDPR in the European Union. This means that any personal information collected during the assessment process must be handled in accordance with the principles of privacy and data protection. Assessors must also ensure that any data collected is only used for the purposes of assessment validation, and that it is not disclosed to unauthorised parties.

Finally, confidentiality is an essential aspect of assessment validation. All information collected during the assessment process, including student data and assessment materials, should be treated as confidential and protected from unauthorised access or disclosure. Assessors must take steps to ensure that any data or materials are stored securely and only accessible to authorised personnel.

Overall, addressing ethics, privacy, and confidentiality requirements during assessment validation is essential for maintaining the integrity and professionalism of the assessment process, as well as protecting the privacy and confidentiality of student information.

Process conducted before and after assessment (KE2.3)

Before and after conducting assessments, several processes need to be carried out to ensure the validity and reliability of the assessments. These processes include validation, moderation, and feedback.

Assessment validation is the process of verifying that the assessment tools and processes are valid, reliable, and fair and that they comply with the requirements of the relevant training package or qualification. It involves confirming the purpose, context, and scope of planned assessment validation, selecting appropriate assessment tools, and gathering evidence to support the validation.

Moderation is the process of ensuring that assessments are consistent and fair across different assessors, locations, and times. It involves the review of assessment outcomes, procedures, and evidence by a panel of assessors or industry experts to ensure that they are valid and reliable. The moderation process helps to ensure that assessment results are consistent and reliable, regardless of who carries out the assessment.

Feedback is the process of providing students with constructive feedback on their assessment performance. Feedback should be clear, specific, and focused on the learning outcomes of the assessment. It should identify areas where the student has done well and areas where they need to improve. Feedback should also provide guidance on how to improve performance and achieve the learning outcomes of the assessment.

Overall, these processes are critical to ensuring the validity, reliability, and fairness of assessments in vocational education and training. By conducting thorough validation, moderation, and feedback processes, educators and trainers can ensure that the assessments accurately measure the knowledge, skills, and abilities of their students and provide meaningful feedback to support their learning and development.

Assessment validation is an essential component of the assessment development process, and its purpose is to ensure that the assessment instruments are valid, reliable, fair, and comply with the relevant standards and requirements. The context and purpose of assessment validation can vary depending on the type of assessment, the industry or sector, and the intended use of the assessment results.

One common context for assessment validation is vocational education and training (VET), where assessments are used to measure the skills and knowledge of students in various industries. In this context, assessment validation is used to verify that the assessment tools and processes are valid and reliable measures of the competencies required in the industry. This is done by reviewing the assessment instruments, collecting feedback from students and other stakeholders, and analysing the assessment results.

Assessment validation can also be used in the workplace context, where assessments are used to measure the skills and knowledge of employees. In this context, assessment validation is used to ensure that the assessment tools and processes are valid and reliable measures of the job requirements and that the assessment results are used for the intended purposes, such as performance evaluation, training, or career development.

Another context for assessment validation is in the certification and licensing of professionals, such as healthcare providers, engineers, and accountants. In this context, assessment validation is used to verify that the assessment tools and processes are valid and reliable measures of the competencies required for the profession and that the assessment results are used for certification or licensing purposes.

Pre- and post-validation of assessment tools (KE2.5)

Pre- and post-validation of assessment tools are critical aspects of assessment validation in vocational education and training (VET). Pre-validation is the process of reviewing and evaluating assessment tools before they are implemented, while post-validation involves reviewing and evaluating assessment tools after they have been used. The purpose of pre-validation is to ensure that the assessment tools are valid, reliable, and fair and that they meet the requirements of the relevant training package or qualification. The purpose of post-validation is to evaluate the effectiveness of the assessment tools and to identify any necessary improvements.

During the pre-validation process, assessors and trainers should review and evaluate the assessment tools to ensure that they are aligned with the training package or qualification. This includes reviewing the assessment items, the assessment instructions, the assessment criteria, and the assessment evidence. It is also important to ensure that the assessment tools are appropriate for the target audience and that they are administered in a fair and consistent manner.

After the assessment tools have been used, the post-validation process involves analysing the results to evaluate the effectiveness of the assessment tools. This includes analysing the assessment data to identify any patterns or trends, reviewing feedback from students and other stakeholders, and evaluating the overall quality of the assessment tools. The post-validation process may also involve making revisions to the assessment tools based on the feedback received or the results of the analysis.

After the validation process of the assessment tool is completed, the next step is to analyse and validate the evidence gathered during the assessment. This step is crucial to ensure that the evidence collected is reliable and valid and meets the requirements of the relevant training package or qualification.

Post-validation of evidence gathered involves analysing the results of the assessment, checking the validity and reliability of the evidence, and making sure that the evidence meets the required standards. The purpose of this step is to confirm that the assessment tool has produced accurate and consistent results and that the evidence gathered is sufficient to support the assessment decisions.

To conduct a post-validation of evidence gathered, assessors need to compare the evidence gathered against the assessment criteria and determine whether it meets the standards required for the qualification or unit of competency. This process involves reviewing the evidence collected, checking for any discrepancies or inconsistencies, and ensuring that the evidence is valid, reliable, and relevant.

In addition to checking the quality of the evidence, assessors also need to ensure that the evidence is properly recorded and stored to maintain confidentiality and privacy. This includes ensuring that the evidence is stored securely, only accessible to authorised personnel, and protected from unauthorised access, loss, or damage.

By conducting a post-validation of evidence gathered, assessors can confirm that the assessment tool has produced valid and reliable evidence and ensure that the assessment decisions are fair, consistent, and meet the required standards. This step is crucial to the overall validation process, as it helps ensure the accuracy and reliability of the assessment results.

Assessment validation checks are a critical aspect of ensuring that the assessment process is fair, valid, and reliable. These checks can be conducted before, during, and after the assessment process to ensure that the assessment tools and processes are suitable for the intended purpose and context.

Before conducting the assessment, validation checks can include reviewing the assessment tools and processes to ensure they are aligned with the training package or qualification requirements and the unit of competency being assessed. This review should also ensure that the assessment tools and processes are appropriate for the intended audience and that they are fair and free from bias.

During the assessment process, validation checks can include monitoring the assessor’s conduct to ensure that they are adhering to the assessment tools and processes and that they are applying the assessment criteria consistently. This monitoring can also include sampling the assessment results to ensure that the assessments are producing consistent and reliable results.

After the assessment, validation checks can include reviewing the assessment results to identify any anomalies or inconsistencies and to ensure that the results are valid and reliable. This review can also include seeking feedback from students and other stakeholders to identify any issues with the assessment process or tools.

To conduct these validation checks effectively, it is important to have clear processes in place that define the roles and responsibilities of the validation team and the procedures for conducting the checks. These processes should also outline the criteria for determining whether the assessment tools and processes are valid and reliable and what actions should be taken if any issues are identified.

1.2 Confirm role and responsibilities of self and others in the validation activities.

A person speaking to a group of people  Description automatically generated with medium confidence

The validation process is a critical component of any assessment or evaluation activity, as it ensures that the results are accurate, reliable, and valid. The validation process involves a range of individuals who have specific roles and responsibilities in ensuring that the assessment or evaluation is conducted in a fair and consistent manner.The role and responsibilities of self and others in the validation activities are crucial in ensuring that the assessment or evaluation is conducted in a fair, consistent, and accurate manner. Each individual involved in the process plays a critical role in ensuring that the results are valid and reliable, and that the assessment or evaluation meets the intended purpose. By working together and fulfilling their respective roles and responsibilities, individuals can ensure that the assessment or evaluation is a valuable and effective tool for measuring knowledge and skills. 

1.2.1 Role and Responsibilities in Validation Activities

Validation activities are a critical part of any assessment or evaluation process. These activities are designed to ensure that the results of the assessment or evaluation are accurate, reliable, and valid. In order to achieve this, there are a number of roles and responsibilities that need to be fulfilled by various individuals involved in the validation process. These individuals include the assessor or evaluator, the validator or validator panel, and the students being assessed or evaluated.

The assessor or evaluator is responsible for developing the assessment or evaluation materials, administering the assessment or evaluation, and interpreting the results. It is their responsibility to ensure that the assessment or evaluation is free from any form of bias and that the results are valid, reliable, and accurate. The validator or validator panel, on the other hand, is responsible for ensuring that the assessment or evaluation is conducted in a fair and consistent manner. They do this by reviewing the assessment or evaluation materials, evaluating the assessment or evaluation process, and providing feedback to the assessor or evaluator. Finally, the students being assessed or evaluated also have a role to play in the validation process by preparing for the assessment or evaluation, completing it to the best of their abilities, and providing feedback on the process.

1.2.2 Importance of Confirming Roles and Responsibilities

Confirming the roles and responsibilities of self and others in validation activities is crucial for ensuring effective and reliable assessments in the vocational education sector. Following is why it is important and how trainers/assessors can accomplish this:

Clarity and Consistency: 

Confirming roles and responsibilities ensures that everyone involved in the validation activities understands their specific roles, tasks, and expectations. This clarity promotes consistency in assessment processes and outcomes.

Collaboration and Accountability: 

By confirming roles, trainers/assessors and other stakeholders are able to work together collaboratively, understanding each other’s contributions and taking ownership of their responsibilities. This fosters a sense of accountability and shared commitment to quality assessments.

Compliance with Standards and Regulations: 

Validation activities must align with relevant standards, guidelines, and regulatory requirements. Confirming roles helps ensure that all involved parties are aware of and comply with these standards, reducing the risk of non-compliance.

Enhancing Validity and Reliability: 

Validity and reliability are essential elements of robust assessments. Confirming roles helps ensure that assessments are valid by involving subject matter experts and aligning with industry requirements. It also promotes reliability by establishing consistent procedures and criteria across assessors.

1.2.3 How Trainers/Assessors Can Confirm Roles and Responsibilities:

1.3 Access and review required assessment system policies and procedures and legislative and regulatory requirements relevant to own job role.

Accessing and reviewing the required assessment system policies, procedures, and legislative and regulatory requirements relevant to Trainer/Assessor’s job role is essential to ensure compliance with the relevant standards and guidelines. It involves becoming familiar with the assessment system policies and procedures and understanding how they apply to the job role. 

Additionally, the Trainer/Assessor needs to review and comprehend the legislative and regulatory requirements related to the assessment process and ensure compliance with them. This process is critical in carrying out assessment activities transparently, fairly, and in line with the necessary standards.

1.3.1 Understanding Assessment System Policies and Procedures

Understanding assessment system policies and procedures is essential for ensuring that assessment practices are carried out effectively and consistently. It is important for assessors to be familiar with the policies and procedures specific to their organisation or training provider, as well as any relevant industry standards or guidelines.

Assessors should begin by familiarising themselves with the assessment system policies and procedures. This involves reviewing any relevant documentation, such as assessment guides, assessment plans, and assessment checklists. It may also involve attending training sessions or workshops to gain a deeper understanding of the policies and procedures.

Once assessors have a good understanding of the assessment system policies and procedures, they can ensure that they are following them consistently. This involves adhering to the documented processes for carrying out assessments, such as the types of evidence that are required, the criteria for assessing competency, and the procedures for collecting and recording evidence.

Assessors should also keep up to date with any changes or updates to the assessment system policies and procedures. This may involve attending regular training or professional development sessions, or checking for updates to the policies and procedures on a regular basis.

By understanding and adhering to the assessment system policies and procedures, assessors can ensure that their assessment practices are fair, consistent, and in line with industry standards and best practices.

Accessing and reviewing the required assessment system policies, procedures, and legislative and regulatory requirements relevant to Trainer/Assessor’s job role is essential to ensure compliance with the relevant standards and guidelines. It involves becoming familiar with the assessment system policies and procedures and understanding how they apply to the job role. Additionally, the Trainer/Assessor needs to review and comprehend the legislative and regulatory requirements related to the assessment process and ensure compliance with them. This process is critical in carrying out assessment activities transparently, fairly, and in line with the necessary standards. 

1.3.1 Understanding Assessment System Policies and Procedures

Understanding assessment system policies and procedures is essential for ensuring that assessment practices are carried out effectively and consistently. It is important for assessors to be familiar with the policies and procedures specific to their organisation or training provider, as well as any relevant industry standards or guidelines.

Assessors should begin by familiarising themselves with the assessment system policies and procedures. This involves reviewing any relevant documentation, such as assessment guides, assessment plans, and assessment checklists. It may also involve attending training sessions or workshops to gain a deeper understanding of the policies and procedures.

Once assessors have a good understanding of the assessment system policies and procedures, they can ensure that they are following them consistently. This involves adhering to the documented processes for carrying out assessments, such as the types of evidence that are required, the criteria for assessing competency, and the procedures for collecting and recording evidence.

Assessors should also keep up to date with any changes or updates to the assessment system policies and procedures. This may involve attending regular training or professional development sessions, or checking for updates to the policies and procedures on a regular basis.

By understanding and adhering to the assessment system policies and procedures, assessors can ensure that their assessment practices are fair, consistent, and in line with industry standards and best practices.

Key features of the organisation’s assessment system (KE3)

The assessment system is a critical aspect of an organisation’s vocational education and training (VET) practices, ensuring that learners are effectively and fairly evaluated against the required competencies. The key features of an organisation’s assessment system, include the key components of assessment system policies, procedures, and documentation, the nature and scope of evidence gathered, organisational requirements for participating in assessment validation activities, and processes for analysing nationally recognised training products to identify evidence needed to demonstrate competence.

The assessment system is a critical aspect of an organisation’s vocational education and training (VET) practices, ensuring that learners are effectively and fairly evaluated against the required competencies. The key features of an organisation’s assessment system, include the key components of assessment system policies, procedures, and documentation, the nature and scope of evidence gathered, organisational requirements for participating in assessment validation activities, and processes for analysing nationally recognised training products to identify evidence needed to demonstrate competence.

The key components of assessment system policies, procedures, and documentation include identifying the assessment tools that need to be validated and the associated mapping document that demonstrates the alignment of these tools with the specific learning outcomes and competency standards.

The organisational requirements for participating in assessment validation activities ensure that the assessment tools and processes are reliable, valid, and meet the required standards. Organisations must have clear guidelines and procedures in place for assessors and other stakeholders to engage in validation activities effectively.

The processes for analysing nationally recognised training products involve a comprehensive review of the training products, such as units of competency and qualifications, to determine the specific evidence that learners need to provide to showcase their skills, knowledge, and capabilities.

By understanding and implementing these key features within their assessment system, organisations can establish a robust and reliable framework that meets industry standards, ensures fairness and consistency in assessments, and ultimately supports the achievement of desired learning outcomes for learners.

Key components of assessment system policies, procedures and documentation are essential in ensuring that the organisation’s assessment processes are consistent, transparent, and meet the requirements of regulatory bodies.

Policies and procedures provide guidelines on how assessments should be conducted, how to ensure that assessments are conducted in a fair and consistent manner, and how to manage the assessment process. 

Assessment Policies

Assessment policies outline the principles, rules, and guidelines that govern the assessment process. They provide a framework for conducting assessments, including the overall approach, assessment methods, and expectations for assessors and learners. These policies ensure consistency and fairness in assessments across different contexts and trainers. 

Assessment Procedures

Assessment procedures outline the step-by-step processes to be followed during the assessment process. They provide detailed instructions on tasks such as scheduling assessments, preparing assessment materials, conducting assessments, collecting evidence, providing feedback, and recording assessment outcomes. These procedures ensure a systematic and consistent approach to assessments.


Documentation

Documentation includes various forms, templates, and records that support the assessment process. This can include assessment plans, assessment instruments (such as written tests or practical task instructions), assessment guides, evidence collection tools, assessment records, and assessment validation documentation. Documentation ensures that the assessment process is well-documented, transparent, and can be audited if required.

The documentation of the assessment process is also essential in the assessment system. This includes the evidence collected during the assessment process and the records of the assessment outcomes. Documentation should be accurate, complete, and easily accessible to ensure that assessment outcomes can be verified and validated if required.

Assessment Tools

Assessment tools in the VET (Vocational Education and Training) sector are instruments or methods used to evaluate and measure the skills, knowledge, and competencies of learners.

These tools help trainers and assessors determine whether learners have achieved the desired learning outcomes. It can be in the form of written tests, practical exercises, or demonstrations. The assessment tool must be valid, reliable, flexible, and fair to ensure that the assessment process is accurate and consistent.

Mapping Document

The mapping document in the VET sector is a crucial document that establishes a connection between the unit of competency or qualification and the assessment tool used. Its purpose is to demonstrate how the assessment tool aligns with the specific elements, performance criteria, and required skills and knowledge outlined in the unit of competency or qualification.

The mapping document serves several important functions:

Overall, key components of assessment system policies, procedures and documentation, including the assessment tool to be validated and associated mapping document, play a significant role in ensuring the quality, consistency, and compliance of the organisation’s assessment processes.

As mentioned earlier, when assessing competency, it is important to gather evidence that is both valid and sufficient. 

The nature and scope of evidence gathered in the assessment process play a crucial role in determining the competence and achievement of learners. Evidence is collected to demonstrate that learners have acquired the required knowledge, skills, and capabilities outlined in the relevant units of competency or qualifications. This evidence can be obtained from various sources and in different forms. 

The nature and scope of evidence gathered, including evidence collected from other parties, includes:

Direct evidence

Direct evidence is obtained through firsthand observation of learners’ performance. It involves assessing learners’ practical skills, application of knowledge, and ability to perform specific tasks or activities. Direct evidence can be collected through practical assessments, simulations, workplace observations, or demonstrations.

Indirect evidence

Indirect evidence is gathered through sources other than direct observation. It includes documentation, records, or products created by learners that provide evidence of their understanding, application, and achievement. Examples of indirect evidence can include written reports, projects, portfolios, or logbooks.

Third-party evidence

Third-party evidence is collected from individuals or organisations external to the assessment process. These parties, such as supervisors, industry experts, or workplace mentors, provide insights and assessments of learners’ performance based on their observation and interaction with the learners in real work settings. Third-party evidence adds credibility and objectivity to the assessment process.

Supplementary evidence

Supplementary evidence supports the main evidence gathered and provides additional context or validation. It can include feedback from peers, self-assessment forms, reflective journals, or testimonials from stakeholders. Supplementary evidence helps to enrich the overall assessment picture and provide a more comprehensive understanding of learners’ capabilities.

The nature and scope of evidence gathered should be valid, meaning it directly relates to the specific unit of competency or qualification being assessed. It should also be sufficient, meaning it provides enough evidence to make a reliable judgment about learners’ competence. The evidence should cover the required performance criteria, knowledge areas, and skills outlined in the relevant training products.

It is important for assessors to ensure the evidence collected is authentic, current, and relevant to the specific context and industry requirements. Assessors should also maintain a clear and transparent process of collecting, documenting, and evaluating evidence to ensure consistency and fairness throughout the assessment process.

By considering the nature and scope of evidence and incorporating evidence from other parties, such as supervisors or industry experts, the assessment process becomes more robust, reliable, and reflective of learners’ actual competence and readiness for the workplace.

Organisational requirements for participating in assessment validation activities (KE3.3)

Participating in assessment validation activities is an important aspect of ensuring the ongoing quality and effectiveness of an organisation’s assessment system. Organisations should have policies and procedures in place to govern their participation in validation activities, including the roles and responsibilities of staff members involved in the process.

Organisational requirements for participating in assessment validation activities are important to ensure the quality, reliability, and validity of the assessment process. These requirements establish the criteria and procedures that organisations must adhere to when engaging in assessment validation: 

Assessment Validation Policy

Organisations should have a documented policy that outlines the purpose, objectives, and principles of assessment validation. The policy should define the roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders involved in the validation process and provide guidance on the frequency and methods of validation activities.

Qualified and Competent Validators

Organisations should ensure that the individuals involved in the assessment validation process have the necessary qualifications, knowledge, and expertise in assessment practices. Validators should possess relevant industry experience, assessment skills, and familiarity with the specific units of competency or qualifications being validated.

Validation Schedule and Plan

Organisations should establish a validation schedule that outlines the frequency and timing of validation activities. A validation plan should be developed, specifying the units of competency or qualifications to be validated, the assessment tools and evidence to be reviewed, and the validation methods to be used. The plan should also identify the resources and timelines required for validation activities.

Engagement of Subject Matter Experts

Organisations should involve subject matter experts (SMEs) in the validation process. SMEs are individuals with in-depth knowledge and experience in the industry or field related to the units of competency or qualifications being validated. SMEs provide valuable insights and expertise to ensure the relevance and currency of the assessment tools and evidence.

Documentation and Record-Keeping

Organisations should maintain clear documentation and records of the assessment validation process. This includes recording the validation activities conducted, the outcomes and recommendations, any modifications or improvements made to the assessment tools, and the evidence of validation undertaken. Proper record-keeping ensures transparency, accountability, and the ability to demonstrate compliance with validation requirements.

Continuous Improvement

Organisations should use the outcomes of assessment validation activities as a basis for continuous improvement. Feedback and recommendations resulting from the validation process should be carefully considered and implemented to enhance the quality and effectiveness of the assessment system.

Compliance with Regulatory Requirements

Organisations must ensure that their assessment validation activities align with the regulatory requirements and standards set by relevant governing bodies or industry regulators. This includes adhering to any specific guidelines or regulations related to assessment validation within the VET sector.

By meeting these organisational requirements, organisations can ensure that their assessment validation activities are rigorous, credible, and aligned with industry standards. Effective assessment validation contributes to maintaining the quality and integrity of the assessment system, improving the reliability of assessment outcomes, and ultimately enhancing the outcomes for learners in vocational education and training.

Processes for analysing nationally recognised training products to identify evidence needed to demonstrate competence are crucial for developing valid and reliable assessment practices. These processes involve a systematic review and examination of the training products, such as units of competency or qualifications, to determine the specific evidence required to demonstrate learners’ competence. 

The key steps involved in this process may include:

Reviewing the Training Products

The first step is to thoroughly review the relevant training products, including the units of competency or qualifications. This involves studying the performance criteria, elements, required skills and knowledge, and other relevant information outlined in the training products. It is important to have a clear understanding of the expected outcomes and the context in which the competencies will be assessed.

Identifying Performance Criteria

Performance criteria define the observable and measurable outcomes that learners must achieve to demonstrate competence. The next step is to identify the performance criteria within the training products and understand the evidence required to meet each criterion. This can involve breaking down the performance criteria into specific actions or tasks that learners need to demonstrate.

Determining Evidence Requirements

Once the performance criteria are identified, the next step is to determine the evidence requirements for each criterion. This involves identifying the types of evidence that can effectively demonstrate learners’ competence, such as direct observation, oral questioning, written assessments, workplace documents, or third-party reports. The evidence requirements should align with the performance criteria and provide a comprehensive and valid assessment of learners’ abilities.

Considering Industry Best Practices

It is important to consider industry best practices and consult with subject matter experts or industry representatives during the analysis process. Their insights can help ensure that the evidence requirements align with current industry standards and practices. Industry input can also provide valuable perspectives on the authenticity and relevance of the evidence required.

Documenting Evidence Mapping

The analysis process should result in a clear and comprehensive mapping document that links the evidence requirements to the specific performance criteria and elements outlined in the training products. This mapping document serves as a guide for assessors and trainers, ensuring that the assessment tasks and evidence collected are aligned with the expected competencies and learning outcomes.

Regular Review and Updates

The analysis of training products to identify evidence requirements should be an ongoing process. It is important to periodically review and update the evidence mapping document to ensure its currency and relevance. This can be done in response to changes in industry practices, regulatory requirements, or feedback from stakeholders.

By following these processes, organisations can ensure that their assessment practices align with the training products, resulting in valid, reliable, and industry-relevant assessments. Analysing training products to identify evidence requirements provides a solid foundation for designing effective assessment tasks and collecting appropriate evidence to demonstrate learners’ competence in the vocational education and training sector.

Assessing competence and participating in assessment validation activities are crucial components of vocational education and training (VET) programs. These activities are subject to legislative and regulatory requirements to ensure that they are conducted in a fair, transparent, and consistent manner.

The regulatory requirements for assessing competence and participating in assessment validation activities can vary depending on the jurisdiction or state in which the VET program is conducted. However, in general, there are certain legislative and regulatory requirements that must be met to ensure that the assessment process is valid, reliable, and accurate. These requirements may include:

Industry relevance and vocational training and learning requirements for those participating in validation activities (KE1.1)

Individuals who participate in validation activities must have a thorough understanding of the industry in which they are working, as well as the vocational training and learning requirements that are relevant to that industry. This knowledge is necessary to ensure that the assessment process is accurate, reliable, and relevant to the needs of the industry.

Industry relevance is a key factor in the success of vocational education and training programs. Validation activities play a crucial role in ensuring that VET programs are relevant to the industry and that they provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed in their chosen careers. Individuals who participate in validation activities must have a deep understanding of the industry and the specific skills and competencies that are required to succeed in that industry. They must also have knowledge of current industry practices and trends to ensure that the assessment process is up-to-date and relevant.

In addition to industry relevance, individuals who participate in validation activities must also have a thorough understanding of the vocational training and learning requirements that are relevant to the industry. This includes knowledge of the relevant training packages, units of competency, and assessment requirements. Individuals must also have knowledge of the assessment tools and processes that are used to assess competency in the industry.

For example, in the construction industry, assessors who are responsible for validating assessments for building and construction qualifications must have extensive knowledge of the industry and the skills and competencies required to work in this field. This may include knowledge of building codes and regulations, occupational health and safety requirements, and construction techniques and processes.

In addition, assessors should have completed relevant vocational training and learning programs, such as a Certificate IV in Training and Assessment, to develop the skills and knowledge required to design and deliver valid and reliable assessments. This may involve training in areas such as assessment design, assessment validation, and the use of assessment tools and techniques.

Assessors should also be up-to-date with industry developments, including changes in regulations, technologies, and work practices, to ensure that their assessments are current and relevant to the industry.

By meeting these industry relevance and vocational training and learning requirements, assessors can contribute to the overall quality of assessment in the VET sector, and ensure that students are assessed to the required industry standard. This can lead to improved employment outcomes for students, increased productivity in the industry, and enhanced recognition of VET qualifications and skills.

To participate in validation activities, individuals must have the necessary qualifications and experience. This may include holding a relevant qualification in the industry or having significant industry experience. Individuals must also have completed training in assessment and validation, and have experience in conducting assessments and participating in validation activities.

Assessors play a critical role in the vocational education and training (VET) system, as they are responsible for assessing the competency of individuals seeking to gain qualifications in their chosen field. Assessors have a range of obligations that they must fulfill to ensure that the assessment process is accurate, fair, and consistent. These obligations include:

Conducting assessments in accordance with the relevant training package or qualification

Assessors must ensure that they are assessing students in accordance with the relevant training package or qualification. This involves being familiar with the competency standards and assessment requirements that are specified in the training package.

Using valid and reliable assessment tools and methods

Assessors must ensure that they are using assessment tools and methods that are valid, reliable, and fair. This includes ensuring that the assessment tools and methods are appropriate for the competency being assessed, and that they are consistently applied to all students being assessed.

Providing clear instructions to students being assessed

Assessors must provide clear instructions to individuals being assessed to ensure that they understand what is expected of them during the assessment process. This includes explaining the assessment process and the criteria that will be used to assess their competency.

Providing feedback and support to students being assessed

Assessors must provide feedback to students being assessed to help them understand their strengths and weaknesses, and to identify areas where they need to improve their competency. Assessors must also provide support to students being assessed to help them develop the necessary skills and knowledge to meet the competency standards.

Maintaining accurate records of the assessment process

Assessors must maintain accurate records of the assessment process, including assessment results, feedback provided to students being assessed, and any other relevant information. These records must be kept in a secure and confidential manner.

Participating in validation activities

Assessors must participate in validation activities to ensure that the assessment process is accurate, reliable, and consistent. This includes participating in moderation activities and contributing to the ongoing development and improvement of the assessment tools and methods.

Principles of assessment (KE1.3)

Assessment is a key component of vocational education and training (VET), and it is essential that assessors understand and apply the principles of assessment to ensure that the assessment process is fair, reliable, and valid.

The following are some of the key principles of assessment:

Fairness

The assessment must be conducted in a fair and impartial manner. This means that all students being assessed must be given an equal opportunity to demonstrate their skills and knowledge, and that assessors must not allow personal biases to influence their assessment.

Flexibility

The assessment must be flexible enough to accommodate the needs of students with diverse learning styles, cultural backgrounds, and disabilities. This may involve providing reasonable adjustments to assessment methods, such as providing extra time or allowing the use of assistive technology.

Validity

The assessment must accurately measure the competencies that it is designed to measure. The assessment must be aligned with the relevant training package or qualification, and must assess the skills and knowledge required to perform tasks in the workplace.

Reliability

The assessment must produce consistent results when administered multiple times under the same conditions. This means that the assessment must be structured in a way that produces consistent outcomes and that assessors must apply assessment criteria consistently.

By applying these principles of assessment, assessors can ensure that the assessment process is fair, reliable, and valid. This, in turn, will help to ensure that students who complete VET programs have the necessary skills and knowledge to succeed in their chosen careers.

Rules of evidence (KE1.4)

The rules of evidence are an important part of vocational education and training (VET) assessment. The rules of evidence outline the types of evidence that can be used to demonstrate a student’s competency, and the conditions under which evidence can be collected and used. 

The following are some of the key rules of evidence:

Validity: 

Evidence must be valid and authentic. This means that the evidence must be directly related to the competency being assessed and must be based on actual performance in the workplace or in a simulated workplace environment.

For example, in a hairdressing assessment, the assessor may observe the learner cutting and styling a client’s hair in a simulated salon environment. The assessor would need to ensure that the evidence collected is directly related to the competency being assessed, such as the learner’s ability to communicate effectively with the client, their knowledge of different hair types and styles, and their ability to use hairdressing tools and equipment safely and effectively.

The evidence collected should be based on actual performance, rather than on hearsay or speculation. This means that the assessor should observe the learner performing the task, rather than relying on third-party reports or assessments.

Sufficiency: 

The evidence collected must be sufficient to demonstrate that the student is competent in the skill or knowledge being assessed. This means that multiple pieces of evidence may be required to demonstrate competency.

For example, in a hospitality assessment, the assessor may need to collect evidence of the learner’s ability to provide customer service, operate point-of-sale equipment, and prepare food and beverages. The assessor may observe the learner performing these tasks in the workplace, and may also review written work, such as a logbook or work diary, to gather additional evidence.

To ensure sufficiency of evidence, the assessor may need to collect evidence from a variety of sources, such as workplace supervisors, colleagues, and customers. This may involve conducting interviews or surveys to gather feedback on the learner’s performance or reviewing documentation such as training records or safety reports.

Authenticity: 

The evidence must be authentic and have been produced by the student being assessed. This means that the evidence must not be plagiarised or copied from another source, and that the student being assessed must have actually produced the evidence.

For example, in a carpentry assessment, the assessor may need to collect evidence of the learner’s ability to use carpentry tools and equipment, read and interpret plans and specifications, and complete carpentry tasks to industry standards. The assessor may observe the learner performing these tasks in the workplace, and may also review documentation such as work records, photographs, and video recordings.

To ensure authenticity of evidence, the assessor must ensure that the evidence has been produced by the student being assessed and is not copied from another source. This may involve confirming with the learner that they have produced the evidence themselves and that it is a true representation of their work.

The assessor may also check for plagiarism or copying by comparing the evidence to other sources, such as online resources or textbooks, and by using plagiarism detection software.

The evidence must be current and relevant to the industry or occupation being assessed. This means that evidence that is more than two years old may not be considered valid unless it can be demonstrated that the skills and knowledge have been maintained.

For example, in a construction assessment, the assessor may need to collect evidence of the learner’s ability to operate machinery, interpret plans and specifications, and comply with workplace health and safety requirements. The assessor may observe the learner performing these tasks in the workplace, and may also review documentation such as training records and work samples.

To ensure currency of evidence, the assessor must ensure that the evidence is current and reflects the latest industry practices and standards. This may involve updating assessment tools and materials, and ensuring that assessors are up-to-date with the latest industry trends and practices.

The assessor may need to review evidence that is more than two years old to determine its currency. If the evidence is deemed to be outdated, the learner may need to undertake additional training or demonstrate that they have maintained their skills and knowledge through ongoing professional development.

By applying these rules of evidence, assessors can ensure that the evidence collected is reliable, valid, and sufficient to demonstrate a student’s competency in a particular skill or knowledge area. This, in turn, helps to ensure that students who complete VET programs have the necessary skills and knowledge to succeed in their chosen careers.

Reasonable adjustment refers to modifications or accommodations made to assessment methods or processes to ensure that students with disabilities, diverse learning styles, or other special needs are not disadvantaged in the assessment process. Reasonable adjustment is an important part of ensuring that the assessment process is fair and equitable for all students.

Examples of reasonable adjustments include providing additional time to complete assessments, using assistive technology, modifying assessment tasks, and providing language, literacy, and numeracy support. The adjustments must be made on an individual basis, taking into account the specific needs of each student being assessed.

Reasonable adjustments must not compromise the integrity of the assessment process or the validity of the assessment outcomes. The adjustments must be made in a way that does not change the nature of the competency being assessed or give an unfair advantage to the student being assessed.

The responsibility for identifying and implementing reasonable adjustments rests with the Registered Training Organisation (RTO) and the assessor. Students being assessed should be given the opportunity to request reasonable adjustments, and the RTO and the assessor should work with the student to identify appropriate adjustments.

By implementing reasonable adjustments, assessors can ensure that the assessment process is fair and equitable for all students, regardless of their disability or other special needs. This can help to ensure that students with disabilities or special needs have the same opportunities to demonstrate their skills and knowledge as other students and can help to promote inclusion and diversity in the VET sector.

Record requirements for assessment validation are an important aspect of ensuring that the assessment process is transparent, fair and accountable. These requirements help to ensure that evidence collected during the assessment process is valid, reliable and sufficient to support assessment decisions. The following are some of the key record requirements for assessment validation:

Evidence collection
The assessor should keep a record of the evidence collected during the assessment process. This includes written records, audio or video recordings, or any other forms of evidence that may have been used.
Retention of evidence
The evidence collected during the assessment process should be retained for a period of time as required by the RTO’s policies and procedures. Typically, this is for a minimum of 12 months from the date of the assessment.
Recording of assessment decisions
The assessment decisions and the rationale for the decisions should be recorded in writing, along with the date of the assessment and the name of the assessor.
Assessment validation records
The RTO should keep records of the validation process, including the names of the validation panel members, the date of the validation, and the outcomes of the validation.
Confidentiality
All assessment records should be kept confidential, and only accessed by those who have a legitimate need to access them, such as the RTO, the assessor and the individual being assessed.
 Security
Assessment records should be stored securely, to prevent loss, damage or unauthorised access.

By maintaining accurate and comprehensive records of the assessment process, assessors and RTOs can ensure that the assessment process is transparent, accountable and compliant with legislative and regulatory requirements. These records also provide valuable evidence in the event of a dispute or challenge to the assessment decision.

1.4 Confirm receipt of documents to be used in validation process and reporting procedures and records.

A picture containing person, indoor, table, desk  Description automatically generated

As part of the assessment validation process, it is crucial for all parties involved to have access to the necessary documents and information. Assessors and validators need to be aware of the documents that will be used during the validation process, and the reporting procedures and records that need to be followed. This includes having a clear understanding of the assessment system policies and procedures, the legislative and regulatory requirements, and the assessment tools and associated mapping documents. By confirming the receipt of these documents, assessors and validators can ensure that they are well-prepared and ready to carry out their role effectively. Additionally, clear reporting procedures and records help to ensure that the validation process is transparent, accountable, and consistent. 

1.4.1 Handling documents used in validation process.

Confirming the receipt of documents to be used in validation activities is a crucial step in ensuring the smooth and efficient running of the validation process. 

The process involves reviewing the documentation, checking for completeness and accuracy of information, and ensuring that the documents are up to date and relevant to the validation activity. It is essential to verify the version of the document being used to avoid any confusion or errors during the validation process. 

Reporting procedures and record-keeping are also critical components of this process, as accurate and detailed records help to ensure that the validation process is conducted in a transparent and accountable manner. In this way, the process for confirming receipt of documents plays a crucial role in ensuring the quality and integrity of the assessment and validation process.

Confirming Receipt of Documents for Validation Process

Confirming the receipt of documents involves ensuring that all required documentation is received, recorded, and stored appropriately.

Reviewing of documentation

It involves a thorough examination of all the relevant documentation to ensure that it is complete, accurate, up-to-date, and relevant to the validation activity.

Understanding the purpose and content of each document

It helps to identify any gaps or discrepancies that may impact the validity, reliability, and fairness of the assessment. The documentation that needs to be reviewed includes the assessment tools, assessment processes, assessment policies and procedures, and the mapping document.

Checking for completeness and accuracy of information

It ensures that all the necessary information required for the validation process is included in the documentation. This includes the assessment criteria, the assessment tasks, the assessment methods, and the evidence requirements.

Verifying the version of the document being used

This helps to avoid any confusion or errors that may arise from using outdated or incorrect versions of the documents.

Ensuring that the documents are up to date and relevant to the validation activity

It helps to ensure that the assessment tools and processes are current and align with the relevant training package or unit of competency. The documents should also be reviewed regularly to ensure that they remain relevant and up-to-date.

Recording of documentation

When participating in validation activities, it is important to have a clear process for recording and managing documentation. This involves developing and implementing a process for recording the receipt of documents, as well as storing and maintaining the documents in a secure and confidential manner. It is also important to identify who has access to the documents and to develop procedures for managing and updating them.

Following process for recording the receipt of documents.

The process for recording the receipt of documents should outline the steps for verifying the documents received, including checking for completeness and accuracy of information, verifying the version of the document being used, and ensuring that the documents are up to date and relevant to the validation activity. This process should also include documenting the date and time of receipt, who received the documents, and any relevant notes or comments.

Storing and maintaining the documents in a secure and confidential manner.

Once the documents have been received and verified, they should be stored in a secure and confidential manner to ensure that they are not accessed or altered by unauthorised individuals. This may involve using password-protected electronic systems or locked filing cabinets for physical documents.

Identifying who has access to the documents.

It is important to identify who has access to the documents and to ensure that access is limited to individuals who require it for the validation activity. This may involve creating an access list or implementing a system for requesting access to the documents.

Following procedures for managing and updating the documents.

Procedures should be developed for managing and updating the documents to ensure that they remain current and relevant. This may involve periodic reviews of the documents, updating them as needed to reflect changes in the validation process or regulatory requirements, and maintaining a record of changes made. By implementing these processes for recording and managing documentation, validation activities can be carried out efficiently and effectively.

Reporting procedures and records

Reporting procedures and records are an essential part of the validation process as they provide a clear overview of the status of the documentation and any issues or concerns identified during the validation process. To ensure that reporting procedures and records are effective, it is important to develop and implement procedures for reporting and record-keeping.

Ensure that reports are accurate, clear, and concise

This means that the reports should be written in a way that is easy to understand and that clearly communicates the results of the validation process. Reports should also be reviewed and edited for errors before being submitted to ensure that they are free from mistakes.

Following procedures for reporting on the status of documentation

This may include issues with the documentation, concerns about the validity of the evidence, or any other issues that may impact the validity of the assessment process. It is important to document these issues and report them to the appropriate personnel so that they can be addressed and resolved.

Storing and maintaining records in a secure and confidential manner

This ensures that the records are not lost or tampered with and that they can be accessed when needed. It is important to identify who has access to the records and to develop and implement procedures for managing and updating the records.

By ensuring that all required documentation is received, recorded, and stored appropriately, the validation process can be conducted effectively and efficiently, providing valuable insights into the quality and effectiveness of the assessment system.

1.5 Review units of competency to identify evidence requirements.

A person looking at a piece of paper  Description automatically generated

eviewing units of competency is an important step in developing an effective assessment strategy. By reviewing the units of competency, an assessor can identify the specific skills and knowledge required to perform a particular task or job role. This process helps to ensure that the assessment is focused on the relevant competencies and that the evidence gathered is relevant and appropriate. 

In this context, the assessor should consider the evidence requirements for each unit of competency, including the knowledge and skills required, as well as the assessment methods that are most appropriate for gathering evidence. This process will help the assessor to develop a targeted and effective assessment plan that meets the needs of the individual being assessed and the requirements of the unit of competency.

1.5.1 Purpose and method of Reviewing Units of Competency

Reviewing units of competency is an essential process that ensures the currency and relevance of training packages. It helps to ensure that the skills and knowledge being assessed are up to date and reflect current industry practices. Reviewing units of competency also helps to ensure that the evidence requirements for assessment are clearly defined, making it easier for assessors to collect the appropriate evidence and determine whether a candidate is competent or not.

Units of Competency

Units of competency are the building blocks of vocational education and training (VET) in Australia. A unit of competency is a statement of the knowledge and skills required to perform a particular job or task to the required standard. Each unit of competency describes what a student must be able to do to demonstrate competency in a particular skill or area of knowledge.

Units of competency are part of a nationally recognised training system and are developed and maintained by industry representatives through a process known as training package development. The Australian Skills Quality Authority (ASQA) is the national regulator responsible for ensuring the quality of VET in Australia, including the development and implementation of units of competency.

Units of competency-Accredited courses:

An accredited course can be made up of units of competencies from existing nationally recognised  training packages and enterprise units of competencies as well. Enterprise units are specifically developed by course owners. These are those units which are not already developed under any nationally recognised training package.

Each unit of competency is made up of the following components:

Elements of Competency

The elements describe the specific outcomes that a learner must achieve to be considered competent in a particular skill or area of knowledge.

Performance Criteria: 

The performance criteria outline the specific actions or behaviours that a learner must demonstrate to achieve the required level of competency in each element.

Performance Evidence:

Performance evidence is an essential component of demonstrating competency in the vocational education field. Vocational education focuses on equipping students with the practical skills and knowledge necessary to succeed in a particular industry or profession. Therefore, performance evidence in vocational education is centred on demonstrating the ability to apply the theoretical knowledge gained in the classroom to practical situations in the workplace.

Performance evidence in vocational education may include work samples, records of workplace observations, assessments completed, and feedback received from supervisors, trainers, and colleagues. 

Knowledge Evidence:

The required knowledge section outlines the theoretical knowledge and practical skills that a learner must possess to be considered competent in the area of knowledge and theory.

Knowledge evidence in vocational education may include written assignments, quizzes, exams, case studies, or research papers that demonstrate the student’s ability to understand and apply theoretical concepts to practical situations.

Assessment Conditions:

Assessment against units of competency is a critical part of VET. Assessment can take many forms, including practical demonstrations, written assessments, and observation of performance in the workplace. Assessment is designed to ensure that learners have the knowledge and skills required to perform a particular job or task to the required standard.

Assessment requirements are an important part of accredited courses and endorsed training package qualifications. They are designed to ensure that learners have achieved the required level of knowledge and skills before they receive their qualification or skill set.

Assessment requirements may include:

Assessment requirements are the guidelines and standards that must be followed to ensure that assessment is valid, reliable, fair, and consistent. Assessment can take many forms and must be conducted by qualified assessors who have the necessary skills, knowledge, and experience to assess learners against the units of competency. Assessment is a critical component of VET and plays a crucial role in ensuring that learners have the skills and knowledge required to perform a particular job or task to the required standard. Assessment must be conducted by qualified assessors who have the necessary skills, knowledge, and experience to assess learners against the units of competency. Assessors must also be trained in the assessment process and have access to appropriate assessment tools and resources. Training providers must also ensure that their assessment practices are consistent with the requirements of nationally recognised training products. There are several assessment requirements that must be met to ensure that assessment is valid and reliable. These include:

Source: Training.gov.au In conclusion, units of competency are the foundation of VET in Australia. They describe the knowledge and skills required to perform a particular job or task to the required standard and are developed and maintained by industry representatives through a nationally recognised training system. Units of competency are flexible and can be customised to suit the needs of different industries and job roles. Assessment against units of competency is critical to ensuring that learners have the knowledge and skills required to perform a particular job or task to the required standard.

Assessments are vital tools used to evaluate an student’s skills, knowledge, and abilities. They provide valuable insights into a learner’s competence and proficiency in various domains, ranging from academic performance to professional skills. However, developing a comprehensive and effective assessment strategy can be a challenging endeavour. To address this challenge, the concept of the “dimensions of competency” has emerged as a guiding framework that helps shape assessment practices.

The dimensions of competency offer a holistic approach to evaluating an student’s capabilities, going beyond a narrow focus on specific skills or knowledge. These dimensions recognise that competence is multifaceted and encompasses various aspects that contribute to overall proficiency in a given domain. By considering these dimensions during assessment design, educators, employers, and professionals can obtain a more accurate and comprehensive understanding of a student’s competency.

These dimensions of competency and how they guide assessment practices are discussed in detail below:

Knowledge Dimension

This dimension focuses on assessing the depth and breadth of a learner’s knowledge in a particular field. It involves evaluating the factual understanding, theoretical foundations, and conceptual frameworks that underpin competency. Assessments in this dimension often include traditional formats like exams, quizzes, or written assignments that measure the level of knowledge acquisition and comprehension.

Skills Dimension

Competency is not solely based on knowledge; practical application is equally important. The skills dimension emphasises assessing a learner’s ability to apply knowledge effectively to real-world situations. This dimension encompasses a wide range of skills, such as problem-solving, critical thinking, communication, teamwork, and technical proficiency. Performance-based assessments, simulations, projects, and presentations are commonly used to evaluate skills dimension.

Attitude Dimension

Competency is not limited to what learners know or can do; their attitudes and dispositions play a crucial role as well. The attitude dimension focuses on assessing attributes like motivation, perseverance, adaptability, ethical behavior, and professionalism. This dimension recognises that personal qualities and mindset are integral to demonstrating competence. Assessments in this dimension may involve self-reflection activities, behavioral observations, or interviews to evaluate attitudes and dispositions.

Meta-competency Dimension

As learners progress in their learning and professional journey, they develop meta-competencies that transcend specific domains. Meta-competencies include learning strategies, self-regulation, metacognition, creativity, and problem-solving skills. This dimension explores an individual’s ability to adapt, learn, and grow across different contexts and challenges. Assessments in this dimension often involve performance tasks, portfolios, or reflective essays that showcase meta-competencies.

By incorporating these dimensions of competency into assessment practices, educators, employers, and professionals can create more comprehensive and meaningful evaluations. It allows for a balanced assessment approach that considers knowledge, skills, attitudes, and meta-competencies, providing a well-rounded understanding of an student’s capabilities. Delving deeper into each dimension involves exploring specific assessment strategies and techniques that align with each dimension, thus facilitating the design of robust and insightful assessments.

1.6 Access and review samples of evidence collected and assessment judgements made.

A picture containing office supplies, person, office instrument, office equipment  Description automatically generated

Accessing and reviewing samples of evidence collected and assessment judgments made is an essential aspect of the assessment process. It helps assessors ensure that the evidence collected is valid, sufficient, and authentic and that the assessment judgments made are fair and consistent. 

By reviewing samples of evidence and assessment judgments, assessors can identify areas of improvement in the assessment process, modify assessment tools and methods if necessary, and provide feedback to learners to support their ongoing learning and development.

1.6.1 Importance of Access and Review

Accessing and reviewing samples of evidence collected and assessment judgments made is an essential step in ensuring the quality and consistency of assessment outcomes. This process enables assessors to confirm that evidence collected is valid, sufficient, authentic, and current. It also allows them to check that assessment judgments made are accurate, reliable, and consistent with the requirements of the relevant training package or accredited course.

The purpose of this review is to verify that the assessment has been conducted in accordance with the assessment system policies and procedures, and to ensure that the assessment decisions are fair, consistent and based on the evidence provided.

Before accessing any evidence or assessment records, it is important to ensure that the necessary organisational requirements are in place. This includes obtaining permission from the relevant parties and ensuring that the records are stored and accessed in accordance with organisational policies and procedures. Access to assessment records should be limited to those who have a legitimate need to access them.

  1.6.2 Key structure, functions, and content of assessment tools (KE5)

Assessment tools play a crucial role in the process of collecting evidence to evaluate a candidate’s knowledge, skills, and performance against the requirements of a unit of competency or qualification. These tools provide a systematic and structured approach to assess candidates, ensuring that the evidence gathered is valid, reliable, and sufficient to make informed judgements about their competency levels.

When reviewing evidence and assessment judgements, it is important to consider the following:

Completeness of the evidence: 

Ensure that all the required evidence has been collected and is available for review

Authenticity of the evidence:

Verify that the evidence collected is genuine and has not been tampered with.

​​Sufficiency of the evidence:

Determine if the evidence collected is sufficient to make a valid assessment decision.

Currency of the evidence:

Check that the evidence is current and relevant to the assessment task.

Reliability and validity of the assessment:

Verify that the assessment process was conducted in a fair and consistent manner and that the assessment decision is based on the evidence provided.

Context and conditions of assessment (KE5.1)

The context and conditions of assessment refer to the specific environment, circumstances, and parameters in which the assessment takes place. 

It is essential to consider and establish these factors to ensure fairness, validity, and reliability of the assessment process.

For example, if the assessment requires a specific tool or equipment, such as a computer or specialised machinery, the context and conditions of assessment should ensure that the candidate has access to and is familiar with the required tools.

Another example could be related to the physical environment of the assessment. If the assessment is for a construction site, the context and conditions of assessment may include appropriate safety measures and personal protective equipment required for working in such an environment.

Some key points to understand the context and conditions of assessment are:

Assessment Context

The assessment context refers to the setting or environment in which the assessment occurs. It can vary depending on the nature of the competency or qualification being assessed.

For example, assessments can take place in a classroom, workplace, simulated environment, or online platform. The context may impact the available resources, tools, and equipment for conducting the assessment.

Assessment Conditions

Assessment conditions encompass the specific requirements, rules, and guidelines that govern the assessment process.

Conditions may include factors such as time limits, availability of reference materials, use of specific equipment or technology, and any special accommodations required for candidates with disabilities or additional needs.

Clearly defining assessment conditions ensures consistency and fairness among candidates and helps maintain the integrity of the assessment outcomes.

Assessment Constraints

Assessment constraints refer to any limitations or restrictions that may affect the assessment process or outcomes.

Constraints can arise from factors such as resource limitations, health and safety considerations, logistical challenges, or regulatory requirements.

It is crucial to identify and address these constraints to ensure that the assessment remains valid and reliable while meeting the necessary standards and compliance requirements.

Authenticity of Assessment

Assessments should strive to reflect authentic or real-world contexts as closely as possible.

The assessment context and conditions should mirror the situations in which candidates would apply their knowledge and skills in the workplace or relevant settings.

By aligning the assessment context with real-life scenarios, candidates can demonstrate their competence in authentic and meaningful ways.

Ethical Considerations

Ethical considerations are essential when determining the context and conditions of assessment.

This includes ensuring privacy and confidentiality of candidates’ information, obtaining informed consent, and adhering to relevant legal and ethical guidelines.

Ethical considerations also encompass addressing potential biases, promoting inclusivity and equity, and treating all candidates fairly and respectfully throughout the assessment process.

Stakeholder Involvement

The context and conditions of assessment may involve collaboration and communication with various stakeholders, such as assessors, candidates, employers, industry representatives, and regulatory bodies.

Engaging stakeholders in the assessment planning process ensures that the context and conditions align with their expectations, requirements, and industry standards.

Context and conditions of assessment can be documented in the assessment plan or instructions provided to the assessor and the candidate. This information should be clear and easy to understand to ensure that the assessment is conducted consistently across all candidates.

Tasks to be administered to the candidate (KE5.2)

Assessment tasks are designed to measure a candidate’s performance against the requirements of the unit of competency. These tasks should be relevant to the workplace and the job roles associated with the unit of competency.

When conducting assessments, it is essential to design and administer appropriate tasks to the candidates. Tasks should be clear, concise, and well-structured, providing candidates with a clear understanding of what is expected from them.

Tasks should align with the specific unit of competency or qualification being assessed, ensuring that they cover the relevant knowledge, skills, and performance criteria.

The complexity level of tasks should be appropriate for the targeted competency level of the candidates.

Tasks should be inclusive and consider the diverse needs and backgrounds of candidates, providing equal opportunities for all to demonstrate their competence.

Below are some considerations and examples of tasks that can be administered to the candidate:

Practical Demonstration Tasks

Practical demonstration tasks require candidates to perform specific skills or tasks in a real or simulated workplace setting.

For example, in a nursing qualification, a practical demonstration task could involve correctly administering a medication or performing a specific nursing procedure.

Written or Oral Response Tasks

Written or oral response tasks assess candidates’ knowledge and understanding of theoretical concepts, procedures, or industry regulations.

For example, candidates may be required to answer a series of questions, complete written assignments, or participate in oral interviews or presentations to demonstrate their understanding.

Case Studies or Problem-Solving Tasks

Case studies or problem-solving tasks present candidates with real or hypothetical scenarios that require them to analyse, evaluate, and apply their knowledge and skills to arrive at appropriate solutions.

For example, in a business management qualification, candidates may be presented with a case study of a struggling company and asked to develop a strategic plan for its turnaround.

Simulation or Role-Play Tasks

Simulation or role-play tasks create a simulated environment where candidates can demonstrate their skills in realistic scenarios.

For example, in a customer service qualification, candidates may be asked to engage in a role-play scenario where they handle customer inquiries, resolve complaints, or demonstrate effective communication skills.

Portfolio Tasks

Portfolio tasks involve candidates compiling a collection of evidence that demonstrates their competence over a period of time.

Candidates may be required to gather samples of their work, reflective journals, testimonials, or other artifacts that showcase their skills and achievements.

Observations and Workplace Assessments

Observations and workplace assessments involve assessors directly observing candidates’ performance in real workplace settings.

Candidates may be assessed while performing tasks, interacting with colleagues or clients, or demonstrating specific skills required for their job role.

The tasks should be clearly defined in the assessment tool, outlining the instructions and requirements for each task, including any equipment, materials, or resources required to complete the task. The assessor should also provide clear instructions to the candidate on how to complete the tasks and the criteria that will be used to assess their performance.

Mapping against units of competency (KE5.3)

Mapping against units of competency involves aligning the assessment tasks, evidence, and criteria with the specific requirements outlined in the relevant units of competency. This process ensures that the assessment addresses the necessary knowledge, skills, and performance criteria specified in the units of competency.

Some key points to consider when mapping against units of competency are:

Understanding the Units of Competency

Thoroughly review and understand the content, performance criteria, and assessment requirements outlined in the units of competency relevant to the assessment. 

Identify the key knowledge areas, skills, and performance outcomes that need to be assessed.

Aligning Assessment Tasks

Identify or design assessment tasks that directly align with the performance criteria and elements described in the units of competency.

Ensure that the tasks assess the required knowledge, skills, and performance outcomes specified in the units of competency.

Consider the different types of assessment methods (e.g., practical demonstrations, written responses, observations) that may be required to assess each performance criterion adequately.

Mapping Assessment Criteria

Develop or adapt assessment criteria and marking rubrics that align with the performance criteria and elements specified in the units of competency.

Ensure that the assessment criteria clearly articulate the expected standards and levels of performance for each criteria.

Align the assessment criteria with the relevant knowledge, skills, and performance outcomes outlined in the units of competency.

Mapping Evidence

Determine the types of evidence that will be collected during the assessment process to demonstrate a candidate’s competence.

Identify which specific evidence items align with the performance criteria and elements outlined in the units of competency.

Document the evidence requirements, such as specific tasks, observations, products, or performances that will be used to gather evidence for each performance criteria.

Cross-Referencing and Documentation

Cross-reference each assessment task, criterion, and evidence item against the relevant units of competency, indicating the alignment and coverage.

Document the mapping between the assessment tasks, criteria, and evidence and the corresponding performance criteria and elements in the units of competency.

This mapping documentation ensures transparency and provides a clear reference for assessors, candidates, and external auditors to understand the relationship between the assessment and the required competencies.

Mapping against units of competency is a critical step in ensuring that assessments accurately and comprehensively evaluate a candidate’s competence. This process helps maintain the integrity and validity of the assessment outcomes and ensures that they meet the established standards and industry requirements.

Documenting review findings and recommendations for improvement

It is important to document the findings of the review and any recommendations for improvement. This information should be used to inform future assessment practices and to ensure that any identified issues are addressed in a timely manner. The documentation should be stored and maintained in accordance with organisational policies and procedures.

By accessing and reviewing samples of evidence collected and assessment judgments made, assessors can ensure that assessment outcomes are accurate, reliable, and consistent with the requirements of the relevant training package or accredited course. This process is essential for maintaining the quality and integrity of the assessment system and ensuring that learners receive the recognition they deserve for their skills and knowledge.

1.6.3 Key features of common assessment methods including suitability for gathering evidence, suitability for the content of units, and associated assessment instruments (KE6)

Assessment methods are techniques or tools used to collect evidence and evaluate an student’s performance or knowledge against a specific set of standards. There are several types of assessment methods available, each with its own unique features and advantages. 

Types of assessment methods can include the following:

Direct observation is a common assessment method that involves the assessor observing the student performing a task or skill in a real or simulated workplace setting. The purpose of direct observation is to gather evidence of the student’s ability to perform the task or skill to the required standard. 

Direct Observation is:

Direct observation requires:

Here is an example of an observation checklist:

Observation Checklist – BSBOPS304 Deliver and monitor a service to customers
Did the student satisfactorilyYesNoComments
1. use a PowerPoint presentation and refer to the Client Case Study and the CBSA Business Plan 
2. use communication skills to establish rapport and build relationships with the client according to organisational requirements
3. identify the client’s needs using appropriate questioning and active listening skills
4. ask questions and listen to gain information or confirm understanding
5. respond to and record customer feedback and action taken according to organisational standards, policies, and procedures
6. provide information or advice using structure and language to suit the client
7. comply with organisational policies and procedures relevant to the role
8. plan and implement systems to gather and organise information
9. adjust their personal communication style in response to the opinions, values, and particular needs of others.
Feedback given to the student


Assessor Signature 
Assessor Name 

This method is particularly suitable for tasks or skills that require practical demonstration, such as operating machinery or providing customer service.

For instance, when assessing customer service skills, direct observation can involve the assessor observing the student interact with customers, handle inquiries, provide assistance, and resolve issues in real-time within the workplace. Alternatively, it could entail a simulated scenario where the student engages in role-plays, simulating customer interactions and demonstrating their customer service abilities.

To ensure that direct observation is a valid assessment method, the assessor must be trained in observation techniques and be able to demonstrate their ability to identify the necessary evidence. The assessor must also ensure that the observation is conducted in a fair and consistent manner and that the evidence is documented accurately and comprehensively.

Product-based methods are assessment techniques that require the student being assessed to produce a product or complete a task as evidence of their competency. This method is often used in vocational education and training programs where the outcome of the task represents a realistic workplace scenario.

Product based methods are:

Evidence could include:

Here is an example of a rubric:

Rubric: CHCCCS011 Meet personal support needs
CriteriaSatisfactoryThe student answers the question within, or under, the word limit.Not yet satisfactoryThe student exceeds the word limit.
Part 1Facilitate choice and self determinationThe student adequately outlines the steps Julie could take to facilitate action and support and empower Emma to meet each of her goals in the table.The student inadequately, incorrectly, or fails to outline the steps Julie could take to facilitate action and support and empower Emma to meet each of her goals in the table.
Part 2Question AChoice and self determinationThe student adequately describes at least one way in which they would ensure Peter is comfortable and has consented to any decisions made regarding his situation.The student inadequately or incorrectly describes at least one way in which they would ensure Peter is comfortable and has consented to any decisions made regarding his situation.
Part 2Question BChoice and self determinationThe student adequately states and describes what they could do and who they would approach if they felt Peter needed support in relation to decisions being made on his behalf.The student inadequately or incorrectly describes what they could do and who they would approach if they felt Peter needed support in relation to decisions being made on his behalf.
Part 2Question CChoice and self determinationThe student adequately describes how they would support Peter in making a complaint.The student inadequately or incorrectly describes how they would support Peter in making a complaint.
Part 3Positive support practicesThe student correctly identifies one way in which each positive lifestyle strategy can positively impact on a person’s lifestyle.The student incorrectly identifies one way in which each positive lifestyle strategy can positively impact on a person’s lifestyle.
Part 4Society and levels of impairmentThe student:- identifies two ways society may affect the level of impairment of an individualAnd- adequately outlines/describes each factor they have identified The student:- fails to identify two ways society may affect the level of impairment of an individualOr- inadequately outlines/describes each factor they have identified
Part 5MotivationThe student:- correctly identifies at least one action or strategy Julie could use to motivate students she provides support for And- correctly identifies at least one type of record she should keepAnd- correctly identifies at least one person she should talk to for supportThe student:- incorrectly identifies at least one action or strategy Julie could use to motivate students she provides support for Or- incorrectly identifies at least one type of record she should keepOr- incorrectly identifies at least one person she should talk to for support
Overall assessment recommendations 
Word countsWord countsWord counts
PlagiarismPlagiarismPlagiarism

Examples of product-based methods include building a piece of furniture, creating a budget or marketing plan, or producing a written report.

For instance, a business management student may be required to create a marketing plan for a new product as part of their assessment. The student would be given a scenario, such as launching a new product in the market, and asked to develop a comprehensive marketing plan to promote the product. The assessor would then review the plan and assess the student’s ability to meet the required standards for marketing strategy, market research, and budgeting.

To ensure the reliability and validity of product-based assessments, it is important to clearly define the criteria for success and provide detailed instructions and guidelines for completing the task. Rubrics or scoring guides can also be used to ensure consistency in the assessment process and provide specific feedback to the student on their performance.

Questioning is a common assessment method used to gather evidence of a learner’s knowledge and understanding. The assessor asks the learner a series of questions related to the topic being assessed. 

Questioning is:

Knowledge Questions – CHCDIV001 Work with diverse people

Tyler is a care worker who understands that building cultural awareness is the first step towards changing perspectives and breaking down social and cultural bias.
1. Which of the following would you advise Tyler to practice for him to achieve greater cultural awareness when working with his clients? Select the three correct answers.
a.Have empathy for others.
b. Celebrate diversity at all times.
c. Suspend judgment of others
d. Maintain control at all times.

2. True or false. Tyler is a carer for Mrs. Dulmah, a Sudanese woman suffering from dementia. As she is in an Australian care facility, it is reasonable for Tyler to expect her to communicate her needs in English. 
a. True
b. False

Evie, an Aboriginal woman recovering from minor surgery, is late for her appointment. Her carer becomes frustrated because she is often late or sometimes does not even attend.

3. What advice would you give to her career in this situation? Select the correct answer.
a. The carer should accept that Aboriginal observance of time and measurement may sometimes differ from their expectations.
b. This is not appropriate, and the carer should refuse to reschedule the appointment.
c. Because she is often late, the carer should not make any future appointments and suggest that Evie attend a different clinic.
d. It is unreasonable for anyone to miss an appointment and Evie should be charged for the service that she missed.
4. True or false. Maxine works with a culturally diverse group of people at an aged care facility. It is important when engaging with clients that Maxine uses language the person understands, such as plain English and avoiding slang.
True
False

Questions may be open-ended or closed-ended, and the level of complexity may vary depending on the level of the unit of competency.

For example, a Mental Health student may be assessed using questioning to demonstrate their knowledge of medications and their side effects. The assessor may ask the student to identify the common side effects of a specific medication, or to explain the appropriate dosage for a particular medication for a specific client.

To ensure the validity and reliability of the assessment, it is essential to develop a well-structured questioning strategy that covers all the required topics and assesses the depth and breadth of the learner’s knowledge.

Evidence from Other Parties (KE6.4)

Evidence from other parties is a valuable source of information to determine an student’s competence. It involves gathering information from sources other than the student being assessed, such as supervisors, colleagues, customers, or other relevant stakeholders who can attest to the student’s skills and knowledge.

Third party evidence can take many forms – an example could include a work report from a work placement supervisor.

Below is an example of a third-party report:

Third Party Report – HLTFSE001 Follow basic food safety practices
InstructionsPlease indicate whether you have observed the candidate performing the tasks/items below by marking the relevant checkbox to indicate ‘Yes’ or ‘No’.You should consider not only whether the candidate can do the tasks/items indicated, but whether they can do them consistently and to your workplace’s expectations and standards, following procedures and work processes at all times.If you have not seen or do not believe the candidate can perform/do the tasks/items, please add comments as your feedback will assist the assessor in making an assessment decision for this particular unit.Add any further comments below.
Tasks/itemsYesNoAssessors use
only (mapping)
Can the candidate:
Identify and report actions or practices that are not in line with the food safety program?PE4, PC3.4 
Act (within the limits of their responsibility) to address such actions?PE4, PC3.5
Report and complete relevant forms relating to corrective actions?PE4, PC3.6 
Follow personal hygiene requirements relating to the wearing and maintenance of appropriate clothing, PPE, jewellery / nail polish bandages / wound dressings? PC1.1, 1.3, KE5.1, 5.2, 5.4,5.5 
Maintain a clean and tidy food handling area?PC2.1, 2.2, 3.3KE2b, c, 6b
Follow procedures to prevent pests and identify / report when pests may be present?PC2.2, 2.3, KE3i, 6a
Follow procedures relating to reporting of illness and absence when unwell?PC1.2, KE5.3
Recognise when it is necessary to wash hands and follow correct handwashing procedures?PC1.1, 1.5, PE1, KE2c, 7a, b
Comments:
Third Party Declaration 
I work/have worked in a supervisory capacity to the candidate.I work/have worked with the candidate at the same level or as a member of their team or have worked/interacted with the candidate in activities relevant to this unit of competency. I have approved the release of workplace documentation (only tick where you work in a supervisory capacity).I can confirm that the evidence submitted by the candidate for their RPL application is their own work (only tick where you work in a supervisory capacity).
Relationship to candidate (please explain in what capacity you have worked with/interacted with the candidate)
Position:
Name of Third Party:
Signature of Third Party:Date: